Day 18: Give Weather Forecast on Live TV

I was in Austin’s Fox News studio doing an interview about my 100 rejections journey this morning. Before I came on, I saw the weather forecast and thought I could do a good job. So I asked to do it at the end of my interview.

With lights and camera in my face, the pressure was on. It would be tough to pursue my request after the first no, like I did in other situations. However, this was two days in a row when I didn’t ask ‘why’ after the initial rejection, which I’m not proud of. Also, I should have offered alternatives, such as asking her to talk to the producer, and maybe invite me back after my 100 days for the weather forecast.

Learning: same as yesterday, if the person say ‘no’, kindly ask why, and then offer a lesser alternative if the initial request isn’t granted. This is Robert Cialdini’s theory of concession in his book Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion.

By the way, I want to thank Fox for the story. Other than getting my name wrong (I’m Jia Jiang, not Jia Jang), it was a story very well put together.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

  • Charles Hua

    Keep the good work, enjoyed it very much.

  • blb1313

    In all fairness regarding you not following up with ‘why’, they were out of time. Your growth has been extraordinary! You may have been nervous, but it doesn’t show. Apparently, the number one fear of most people; public speaking, is not a problem for you. Keep ‘em coming.

  • Kristine

    You’re doing a Great job … relaxed confidence in just 18 days from your Day 1 video … I wonder if your growth will be exponential or linear? By Day 100 you’ll be almost unstoppable.

  • DMG

    no fear. wish I could remember that. Idea: hold babies in the intensive care unit.

  • Kyle C

    You really should make smaller requests after the initial request, because psychologically, people are more likely to say yes to the second request after saying no to the first. You can still get your ‘no’s (possibly even multiple) but also get something out of it as well.

  • Jeff Evans

    Awesome! I noticed weak language before you even made the request. (“I don’t know when, but . . .”) I do the same thing! So often, I lose the power of my point in a parenthetical statement. Idea: ask to help feed a dangerous animal at the zoo, that way you can face the fear of failure and success at the same time!